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Research Instruction

Information Literacy Concepts

It's All About the Questions

It's All About the Questions

Questions drive a lot of what we do every day. Sometimes, they’re simple. At other times, our experiences lead us to ask more complicated questions that can’t be answered so easily and require in-depth research. How do you begin to think about developing and exploring these more complex questions in a world where facts and quick “answers” are just a click away?

Video created by Edmon Low Library and used under a Creative Commons 4.0 CC BY-NC Attribution-Non Commercial License

  

Narrow Your Research Focus

Narrow Your Research Focus

by Dr. Thomas Mapes' (Associate Professor of English at Luther Rice) Video Lecture

View all of Dr. Mapes' video Lectures on the Research Process

Choose a Topic (Or gain understanding on the one you have been assigned)

Video Series by ProQuest Research Companion (Requires Student or Faculty Login)

This set of videos from ProQuest Research Companion (which requires your student login to access) covers the following:

  • Researchers will know how to distinguish between topics they’re curious about and those they merely like.
  • Researchers will understand the risks associated with having an extremely strong opinion on a topic.
  • Researchers will know how to use questions to generate a specific and focused research topic.
  • Researchers will understand that academic research involves learning things they don’t know, not simply proving what they think they do.

Write a Thesis Statement

Video Series by ProQuest Research Companion (Requires Student or Faculty Login)

This set of videos from ProQuest Research Companion (which requires your student login to access) covers the following:

  • Researchers will know how to create a main claim, or thesis, that is debatable and provable.
  • Researchers will understand how to narrow their thesis statement so that it's hard to refute.
  • Researchers will know how to acknowledge and address counterarguments in their thesis statement.
  • Researchers will understand how to use their thesis statement to forecast their argument's organization.