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Research Instruction

Information Literacy Concepts

Engage in the Scholarly Conversation

Research is a Conversation

Academic research can be difficult, but you’re not alone! Research is a conversation between many different “voices” that each contribute a unique perspective on a topic. There are many ways that you can use that conversation to help improve your understanding of a topic and discover what you have to say about it.

Video created by Edmon Low Library and used under a Creative Commons 4.0 CC BY-NC Attribution-Non Commercial License

  

Engage Sources Critically

Engage Sources Critically

by Dr. Thomas Mapes' (Associate Professor of English at Luther Rice) Video Lecture

Organize Your Argument

How Do I Organize My Argument?

Video Series by ProQuest Research Companion (Requires Student or Faculty Login)

This set of videos from ProQuest Research Companion (which requires your student login to access) covers the following:

  • Researchers will understand the importance of creating an outline.
  • Researchers will understand the difference between a literal audience and an implied audience.
  • Researchers will understand how to arrange their argument in a way that is likely to prove most persuasive to their implied audience.
  • Researchers will recognize and understand the importance of an introduction, context, definitions, refutation of counterarguments, subclaims and evidence, and a conclusion.

Use the Best Evidence to Make Your Point

What Counts as Evidence?

Video Series by ProQuest Research Companion (Requires Student or Faculty Login)

This set of videos from ProQuest Research Companion (which requires your student login to access) covers the following:

  • Researchers will recognize the difference between evidence that is merely consistent with a claim and evidence that actively supports it.
  • Researchers will learn to avoid confusing evidence with feelings of certainty or anecdotes.
  • Researchers will learn what type of evidence experts, statistics, and scientific studies can provide.

Revise Your Work

What Do I Look for When I Revise?

Video Series by ProQuest Research Companion (Requires Student or Faculty Login)

This set of videos from ProQuest Research Companion (which requires your student login to access) covers the following:

  • Researchers will understand how revising can dramatically improve their research paper.
  • Researchers will know how to make global revisions, including looking at their arguments, main ideas, and organization.
  • Researchers will learn ways to improve transitions, paragraphs, and sentences.
  • Researchers will understand the importance of formatting their paper according to an assigned citation style.